동국포스트

Saturday,January 23,2021
Last Update : 6:38 PM ET
상단여백
HOME International
Movements Spread to Find Alternatives to Over Priced University Textbooks
A student is looking for textbooks in the Dongguk University campus bookstore. 
/Photograph by Yang In-hyuck

The overly expensive university textbooks is one of the most discussed issues related to the 
controversy on the “price of education.” Not surprisingly, movements to reduce prices of 
texbooks used in universities have been trending over two decades as the prices showed a 
rapid and constant increase, internationally. Consequently, the students, as well as 
universities and private firms, decided to fight back in diverse methods. New, creative 
solutions are being practiced, but still have long ways to go as they face inevitable limitations.


Textbooks have been an economic burden for every student

   According to the U.S.A. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average prices of university 
textbooks in America has shown an increase of 258 percent since 1998. In contrast, the 
prices of recreational books increased by 14 percent. According to Ethan Senack, the federal
Higher Education Advocate, the reason why textbooks are so expensive is because of the 
constant changes in educational courses of higher education. Every time a certain major 
shifts learning directions, publishing companies are justified in their actions to announce a 
new edition, every year, each with higher prices.

   He also mentioned how textbook prices are underestimated as a financial problem. 
“Textbook prices appear small in comparison with the larger costs of tuition or room and 
board, they are often overlooked, and addressing this problem is often deprioritized,” he 
commented. 

   Such realities obviously bring contempt from the students, so much to the point that some
decided to use methods prohibited from the federal law. Since 2006, university students
from the U.S.A., Europe, and East Asia have been illegally ordering textbooks made in India.
With their cheap labor costs, they are paper bound, written in only black ink and cost as 
much as ten percent of that of American. Although many countries ban such acts, due to the
easy access and difficulties in regulation, shipping textbooks from India is still well used by 
many students.

   “It is funny how some people think that this is some kind of defiance from a small number
of unethical students,” commented Ernan Tan, a student of the Lakeside University in 
Malaysia.“Well it is not. We, students, order books made on India as a group, according to 
our classes.”

Efforts to cut down the prices are being spread

   Despite the Indian source being welcomed, there are students who try to stay economical
within the legal boundaries. “Legamus!” is an online audio book sharing site made by  
students. Its users read and record texts that are used in university lectures, which are then  
posted and shared by others in diverse languages such as English, German, French,  
Latin, and so on. The global administrator of “Legamus!” who goes by the ID “Victor” 
mentioned that the best feature of the site is its convenience. “Readers of Legamus are all
volunteers. All you need is a computer, an internet connection, and a microphone.”

  Efforts from the schools and private companies are prominent. Open Textbook Network
(OTN), an online educational resource network is run and used by 200 universities in 
America. Any registered member can download pages of textbooks for free, which saves
up to 1.5 million dollars of students’ pockets every year. Park Sangpil, an international 
student at Utah Flight School and a user of the network, said, “The amount of financial 
support I have received from OTN is huge. Without OTN, there would have been so many 
limits to spending here in America as an international student.”

   Amazon has also stepped into the front to achieve a mutually beneficial deal with the 
schools and their students. Since 2015, 29 universities sealed partnerships with Amazon, and 
their students order every textbook they need online from the Amazon.com website. This, 
according to the user reviews, can be 30 percent cheaper when bought or rented, and 70 
percent cheaper than buying offline in the campus. “Students are looking for ways to save 
money on textbooks, which is why we have long offered great prices on both new and used
textbooks,” said Ripley MacDonald, Director of Textbooks at Amazon.

   Korea is not an exception to such trending phenomenon. “Bookdeal” is a Korean Android
application which services second handed textbook sales. “We began the launch around the  
start of the second semester, which makes us fairly new, like most other startups dealing with
university textbooks in Korea,” stated Ellie Kim, the marketing manager of Bookdeal.  
“However, the numbers of the textbook startups are rising, meaning that there are a lot of 
students concerned about the prices of textbooks, and that equal number of efforts is also  
being made.” 

 

The lack of infrastructure and skewed perceptions must be overcome
  
   In a whole, students around the globe are using second hand, cyber networks and even 
illegal methods to save up their money. While it is true that using illegal methods is wrong, it
also shows how much economic stress the students are carrying on their shoulders. Ethan 
Senack articulated that if methods such as the opened resource networks and the usage 
second hands were to become a mainstream source for the sake of the students, there are 
two main barriers to overcome.

   Firstly, supportive infrastructures for the developers of the systems are required. Right now,
in countries such as the U.S.A. and Korea, nearly all infrastructures for creation and design of
educational materials are centralized in a few major publishing companies. As a result, higher
education is dominated by closed license, high cost, rigid materials. “While there has been 
some progress toward supporting localized content development, it has not been enough to
turn the cultural lethargy in education on its head,” he said. Ellie Kim also mentioned that the 
lack of human resources is Bookdeal’s main problem.

   More importantly, skewed perceptions about using the alternative systems must be erased.
Years of dominance by profit maximizing publishers have created false measures of quality 
on university textbooks. “Traditional textbooks face no standardized test of efficacy, or
student success. Instead, publishers rely on fancy covers, high profile authors, and cultivated 
systems of reviewers to make their profit.”

   “If we are ever to solve the threat of high textbook prices, we must fully realize the 
potential of the alternative sources to revolutionize educational content, and invest 
accordingly,” he concluded. 

Yang In-hyuck  arhan373@dongguk.edu

<저작권자 © 동국포스트, 무단 전재 및 재배포 금지>

Yang In-hyuck의 다른기사 보기
icon인기기사
기사 댓글 0
전체보기
첫번째 댓글을 남겨주세요.
여백
여백
여백
Back to Top